Posts Tagged ‘tourism’

Some Guidelines for Staying in a Bed and Brekfast or Inn

Monday, June 13th, 2016

by Linda Burchell Ard

Although staying in a bed or breakfast while traveling in Europe is pretty common, many American have never stayed in this type of lodging facility. During breakfast recently, I asked some guests from England and Germany what they would want to tell Americans about staying in a Bed & Breakfast or Inn.
They said B&Bs are a great way to travel and really learn about areas. The locals always know, among other things, the best places to eat, and the cheapest places to buy gas, and the highway construction areas to avoid. They can also recommend interesting local activities, historic sites and even fun shopping. The properties are well loved and so clean—and the breakfasts are freshly made and delicious. The innkeepers are usually very friendly and welcoming so it is like staying with family.
Then I asked, “How is this different from staying in hotels or motels?”
They said that sometimes, when you are in a hurry and are just looking for a convenient bed for the night, a motel might work better. But many hotel rooms look just the same and some are noisy or brightly lighted. The guestrooms are not relaxing and lack charm.
Feeling on a roll, I continued with, “Some people who haven’t stayed in Bed and Breakfasts are concerned that they might not know the right way to act in a B&B.”
The couple laughed at this question and the wife explained that her husband still didn’t know the right way to act. He just shook his head and agreed. Then, combining their wealth of experience, they clicked off a few simple suggestions:
• Remember that you are staying in someone’s home so you’ll want to be respectful.
• Ring the doorbell, unless directed otherwise, before walking in.
• If you arrived before check-in (usually 4 to 6 p.m.), your room might not be ready. Also, if you are going to be later than you had planned, just contact the innkeeper in case she/he has made plans for the evening or needs to run to the store.
• Every Bed and Breakfast is unique and has different policies so ask the innkeeper. There are often rules about children, pets, parking, smoking, use of alcohol, forms of payment, or cancellation.
• In most Bed and Breakfasts, there are “common areas” for the guests to use and enjoy as well as private areas reserved for the innkeepers, their staff and families. Such areas may be used for storage, office work, meal preparation or just relaxing. It is important to respect the innkeepers’ need for privacy.
I thought their advice might be helpful for other folks who have always thought it would be fun to stay in a Bed and Breakfast but never had the experience.
As I cleaned up the breakfast table, they were getting ready to pack up and hit the road again. Before they left, I got hugs from both of them and I wished them safe travels. They stopped to pat Buster, our friendly farm dog, and take a picture of the Inn. I bet that departing ritual doesn’t happen often at most motels or hotels!
Linda Burchell Ard and her husband Bob are Innkeepers and owners of at Burchell’s White Hill Farmhouse Inn, historical bed and breakfast located in the middle of a family owned working farm in Minden, NE. To learn more, visit “http://www.burchellfarmhouseinn.com” or Burchell’s White Hill Farmhouse Inn on Facebook or email blard@gtmc.net. You can also check out wonderful Nebraska B&B locations at www.nebraskabb.com and enjoy the better way to stay.

Nebraska tourism director to help promote newly recognized Underground Railroad sites

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012

Nebraska tourism director to help promote newly recognized Underground Railroad sites

 

LINCOLN, NEB. (May 2, 2012)—Three Nebraska City sites and one program will be recognized Thursday for their inclusion in the National Park Service’s national Underground Railroad program.

 

Kathy McKillip, director of the Nebraska Department of Economic Development’s Travel and Tourism Division, will be on hand for a 12:30 p.m. ribbon cutting ceremony at the Old Freighters Museum, 407 N. 14th St., Nebraska City.

 

The ceremony, sponsored by the Nebraska City Tourism & Commerce office, will commemorate the new Network to Freedom listings in Nebraska. The National Park Service’s Network to Freedom program coordinates preservation and education efforts of Underground Railroad sites nationwide.

 

Last year, Arlington High School teacher Barry Jurgensen and his students conducted research on sites related to the Underground Railroad. Three of the Nebraska City sites, along with one program, Dr. Sara Crook’s portrayal of Barbara Mayhew, were added to the Network to Freedom program last August. The sites are:

 

  • The Nuckolls Residence, where two slaves, Eliza Grayson and Celia, owned by Stephen F. Nuckolls escaped on Nov. 26, 1958.
  • The Majors Residence, the site of the escape of six slaves, owned by Alexander Majors, in 1860.
  • Camp Creek Cemetery, where Barbara (Kagy) Mahew Bradway is buried. She and her husband lived in Mayhew Cabin when it was part of the Underground Railroad.

 

The new listings will complement the Mayhew Cabin, which is already part of the Network to Freedom.

 

The Mayhew Cabin Foundation recently received funding from the Nelson Family Foundation of Nebraska City to install outdoor markers recognizing the history of the new Network to Freedom sites and creating a driving tour.

Travel Industry Responds to President Obama’s National Tourism Strategy Announcement

Saturday, March 31st, 2012

Travel Industry Responds to President Obama’s National Tourism Strategy Announcement

by on January 20, 2012 in Marketing, This Just In, Tourism

Yesterday, in Orlando, FL, President Obama announced new initiatives that will significantly increase travel and tourism in the United States. According to a White House statement, yesterday’s announcement calls for a national strategy to make the United States the world’s top travel and tourism destination, as part of a comprehensive effort to spur job creation. The number of travelers from emerging economies with growing middle classes – such as China, Brazil, and India – is projected to grow by 135%, 274% and 50% respectively by 2016 when compared to 2010.

The U.S. tourism and travel industry is a substantial component of U.S. GDP and employment, representing 2.7 percent of GDP and 7.5 million jobs in 2010 – with international travel to the United States supporting 1.2 million jobs alone. The travel and tourism industry projects that more than 1 million American jobs could be created over the next decade if the U.S. increased its share of the international travel market.

Key components of the President’s initiative include the creation of an interagency task force charged with developing a National Travel & Tourism Strategy, shortening visa wait times, expanding Global Entry, promoting our national parks and working to expand the visa waiver program.

Tourism advocates are touting this groundbreaking announcement as a major victory, and rightfully so, but the question remains, how will this strategy affect and assist American place marketers in the years to come?  We welcome your thoughts here.

Here are some snapshots at what some of your colleagues are saying about the announcement:

Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority:

LVCVA President/CEO Rossi Ralenkotter, who was in attendance for the announcement, commended the President’s actions. “Tourism is the No. 1 economic driver in Southern Nevada and one of the leading forces in our national economy, so to have a national effort to increase tourism supported by the White House is tremendous,” Ralenkotter said.

Visit California:

“International visitation remains an untapped pot of gold when people cannot get here,” said Caroline Beteta, President and CEO of Visit California and Vice-Chair of Brand USA. “With an abundance of visitor experiences and a brand loved worldwide, California has a tremendous opportunity to benefit from efforts to improve the entry process for foreign visitors and remain the number one tourist destination in the United States.”

North Carolina Department of Commerce:

“Today’s announcement marks a turning point for our industry and provides us with unparalleled opportunity to work toward a national travel and tourism strategy,” said Lynn Minges, Assistant Secretary of Tourism, Marketing and Global Branding in the N. C. Department of Commerce. Minges said. “These efforts to make it easier for international visitors to get here will have a positive impact on North Carolina’s economy because their spending supports jobs and adds to tax revenues in the state.”

The addition of Charlotte Douglas (CLT) to the Global Entry program, created by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, makes the airport more inviting to international travelers. The airport, which ranks seventh in the world in takeoffs and landings, has nonstop direct service from more than 30 international cities.


About Brittani

Brittani Wood is a Senior Account Executive and Digital and Social Media Manager for Tourism. Since joining DCI in 2008, she has worked with destinations from Finger Lakes Wine Country to New Mexico to Tasmania, creating traditional and digital communications campaigns that increase awareness of travel destinations among media and consumers.

Travel Industry Responds to President Obama’s National Tourism Strategy Announcement

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Travel Industry Responds to President Obama’s National Tourism Strategy Announcement

by on January 20, 2012 in Marketing, This Just In, Tourism

Yesterday, in Orlando, FL, President Obama announced new initiatives that will significantly increase travel and tourism in the United States. According to a White House statement, yesterday’s announcement calls for a national strategy to make the United States the world’s top travel and tourism destination, as part of a comprehensive effort to spur job creation. The number of travelers from emerging economies with growing middle classes – such as China, Brazil, and India – is projected to grow by 135%, 274% and 50% respectively by 2016 when compared to 2010.

The U.S. tourism and travel industry is a substantial component of U.S. GDP and employment, representing 2.7 percent of GDP and 7.5 million jobs in 2010 – with international travel to the United States supporting 1.2 million jobs alone. The travel and tourism industry projects that more than 1 million American jobs could be created over the next decade if the U.S. increased its share of the international travel market.

Key components of the President’s initiative include the creation of an interagency task force charged with developing a National Travel & Tourism Strategy, shortening visa wait times, expanding Global Entry, promoting our national parks and working to expand the visa waiver program.

Tourism advocates are touting this groundbreaking announcement as a major victory, and rightfully so, but the question remains, how will this strategy affect and assist American place marketers in the years to come?  We welcome your thoughts here.

Here are some snapshots at what some of your colleagues are saying about the announcement:

Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority:

LVCVA President/CEO Rossi Ralenkotter, who was in attendance for the announcement, commended the President’s actions. “Tourism is the No. 1 economic driver in Southern Nevada and one of the leading forces in our national economy, so to have a national effort to increase tourism supported by the White House is tremendous,” Ralenkotter said.

Visit California:

“International visitation remains an untapped pot of gold when people cannot get here,” said Caroline Beteta, President and CEO of Visit California and Vice-Chair of Brand USA. “With an abundance of visitor experiences and a brand loved worldwide, California has a tremendous opportunity to benefit from efforts to improve the entry process for foreign visitors and remain the number one tourist destination in the United States.”

North Carolina Department of Commerce:

“Today’s announcement marks a turning point for our industry and provides us with unparalleled opportunity to work toward a national travel and tourism strategy,” said Lynn Minges, Assistant Secretary of Tourism, Marketing and Global Branding in the N. C. Department of Commerce. Minges said. “These efforts to make it easier for international visitors to get here will have a positive impact on North Carolina’s economy because their spending supports jobs and adds to tax revenues in the state.”

The addition of Charlotte Douglas (CLT) to the Global Entry program, created by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, makes the airport more inviting to international travelers. The airport, which ranks seventh in the world in takeoffs and landings, has nonstop direct service from more than 30 international cities.


About Brittani

Brittani Wood is a Senior Account Executive and Digital and Social Media Manager for Tourism. Since joining DCI in 2008, she has worked with destinations from Finger Lakes Wine Country to New Mexico to Tasmania, creating traditional and digital communications campaigns that increase awareness of travel destinations among media and consumers.

Hotels turning to digital concierge services

Thursday, July 28th, 2011

Hotels turning to digital concierge services

By Jane L. Levere

New York Times

Posted: 07/04/2011 04:46:56 AM PDT
Updated: 07/04/2011 04:47:03 AM PDT

 

Click photo to enlarge

Wes Landsfeld, from Ft. Worth, Texas, uses the GoBoard, a 55-inch… ( LIBRADO ROMERO )

Some hotels have begun to expand the definition of concierge to mean more than just a knowledgeable employee. It now can also mean smart digital devices. Software companies are creating programs that offer information like restaurant recommendations, flight arrivals and departures and driving directions via smartphones, touch-screen devices, iPads and other electronics to guests at mintier hotels that do not provide traditional concierge services.

Even more upscale brands that employ human concierges are joining in. They are offering location-specific information, developed by each hotel’s staff, accessible via the Internet, iPhone apps and even live chats. And all Hyatt hotels let guests send requests, via Twitter, to customer service agents who are on call 24 hours a day.

When it comes to concierge services, “we as an industry cannot operate in an analog way in a digital world,” said John Wallis, global head of marketing and brand strategy for Hyatt Hotels.

With the proliferation of misprice and limited-service brands, high-tech concierge services represent an effort by hotel companies “to differentiate themselves, to add a service that usually ranks among the highest for guest satisfaction and to achieve higher rates,” said Bjorn Hanson, divisional dean of the Preston Robert Tisch Center for Hospitality, Tourism and Sports Management at New York University.

He said


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these services could be more attractive to younger guests, “Gen-Xers and Millennials, the target segment for many of these brands, who typically require or even prefer less personal interaction, and desire quick answers, any time, day or night.” Older, more international guests, he said, “tend to prefer personal service.”Still, the question remains whether digital concierges can ever equal their human counterparts. Henry Harteveldt, travel analyst for Forrester Research, said he did not think they would. “Nothing will ever replace a face-to-face concierge,” he said. “A guest visiting a city for the first time will have a lot of questions and will need to have interaction with a concierge that technology won’t replace.”

But hotel chains are moving ahead with the digital version nonetheless. InterContinental Hotels has been among the most aggressive developers of high-tech concierge services, starting in 2007 with videos starring individual hotel concierges offering destination-specific advice. Today, 150 of the brand’s 171 hotels have created the videos, which are available on each hotel’s website and on YouTube and iTunes.

Intercontinental has given, on a trial basis, iPads to concierges at 10 hotels to offer guests advice. It has also developed an iPad app with the same information for use by guests. In addition, the company is now testing live chats between guests and concierges through Skype and FaceTime, by Apple (AAPL). Hotel employees meet weekly to update destination information. And guests receive an email from the chief concierge five days before arrival offering suggestions and maps.

Last year, Marriott International’s Renaissance hotels — there are more than 150 in 34 countries — introduced a program called Navigator that offers suggestions for dining, drinks, shopping and sightseeing. This information, generated by Wcities, an online destination content provider, and by hotel employees, can be found on each hotel’s Web page and on an iPhone app. Guests can also ask Renaissance’s human concierges for help.

Hyatt’s high-tech concierge service, offered to guests at all of its hotels, luxury or mintier, is Twitter-based. Introduced two years ago, it lets guests send requests to HyattConcierge. Customer service agents in Omaha; Mainz, Germany; and Melbourne, Australia, must respond to messages in 15 minutes or less. If requests require more than a 140-character response, the agent will email or call the guest. One recent message came from a guest at the Andaz Wall Street, who, rather than calling hotel workers directly, requested a hangover remedy that included two extra-strength Advil and wheat toast with butter.

Marriott International’s Courtyard, a mintier brand, has gone in a different digital direction. Its GoBoard, a 55-inch touch-screen device in the hotel lobby uses software, from Four Winds Interactive, to provide weather information, news headlines and employee recommendations for restaurants and other local attractions. Marriott plans to upgrade the information provided through the devices this summer, and will offer them brandwide by 2013, said Janis Milham, vice president of Courtyard.

Intelity, another software provider, is working with Wyndham’s Wingate hotels, Starwood’s Aloft hotels and others to give guests airline information as well as customized dining, shopping and recreation recommendations through laptops, iPads, touch-screen devices, televisions and mobile phones.

Wyndham Worldwide will give owners of hotels in its 15 brands the option of offering the Intelity service to guests, said Paul Davis, senior vice president for strategic sourcing. He said some of the recommendations of service providers are paid listings by the providers.

Aloft is testing Intelity’s program on iPads in hotel lobbies. Brian McGuinness, Aloft’s global brand leader, said much information offered to guests was generated by hotel employees and none is the result of advertising.

Golf Nebraska Campaign in Full Swing

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

Golf Nebraska Campaign in Full Swing

 

LINCOLN, NEB. (July 12, 2011) — Nebraskans know their state is home to great golf courses. The Golf Nebraska campaign is taking that message beyond the state’s boundaries to attract more golfers from around the region to play — and stay — in Nebraska. It’s a project of the Nebraska Department of Economic Development’s Travel and Tourism Division.

 

“Nebraska is among Golf Digest’s top 10 golf states,” said Christian Hornbaker, director of the Travel and Tourism Division. “And golf is already a $260 million business in Nebraska. We want to grow that part of our state’s economy by attracting more visitors to play our outstanding and affordable public and semiprivate courses.”

 

Television commercials and website advertising are targeting golfers in surrounding states, encouraging them to “Get Driving” to Nebraska for a golf vacation. The campaign also includes emails sent to golfers throughout the region and an expanded Web page at VisitNebraska.gov/golf. A mobile Web page includes a list of courses and possible trip itineraries at VisitNebraska.gov/golfers.

 

Social media sites also offer golfers new ways to learn about Nebraska golf courses and engage other golfers. GolfNebraskaBlog.com provides course reviews through the eyes of avid golfers who share their impressions of the courses they play and the people they meet. Blog postings with photos and videos will be added throughout the summer.

 

The GolfNebraska Facebook page is a place to connect with golfers who play Nebraska courses or want to travel to Nebraska for a golf getaway. Visitors will find news, photos and videos about Nebraska golf at facebook.com/GolfNebraska. Anyone who plays Nebraska courses or is considering a golf trip to the state is welcome to share their thoughts, experiences and questions about golf in Nebraska.

 

Nebraska has more than 200 public and semiprivate golf courses. Several have been recognized by national golf publications for their design, scenery and value.

Fighting the impact of flooding on tourism in Nebraska

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

Fighting the impact of flooding on tourism
Whitepaper will help you reach out to travelers, media

LINCOLN, NEB. (July 12, 2011)—Communities, attractions, businesses and outfitters across the state are being affected by flooding and the perception of flooding. In some cases, the rumors are worse than the actual flooding.

 

The Department of Economic Development’s Travel and Tourism Division is getting the word out that Nebraska is accessible, safe and open. We are working with the Omaha World-Herald on a series of stories featuring attractions and events in communities impacted by flooding, and we are working with state, regional and national news outlets to re-enforce the message that Nebraska is “open for business.”

 

The Division is using its social networking sites to tell travelers about all the great things there are to do here and how few have been closed because of flooding.

 

We also want to give you the resources you need to proactively communicate with travelers through relevant media outlets. To assist you in this effort, we have written a whitepaper on “Three Ways to Effectively Promote Your Tourism Business This Season.” It outlines three easy-to-implement strategies for effectively communicating with travelers and the media during times of crisis. You can download it here: http://industry.visitnebraska.org/pdfs/Three_Ways.pdf.

Together, we can work to turn this potentially negative situation into a positive opportunity for growth.

 

Greener Program Expands Across Nebraska

Friday, April 22nd, 2011

FOR INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Shannon Peterson at 800-228-4307, 402-471-3797,

or shannon.j.peterson@nebraska.gov

Tom Tabor at 800-228-4307, 402-471-7755

or tom.tabor@nebraska.gov

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Greener Program Expands Across Nebraska

 

LINCOLN, NEB (April 22, 2011)—The Greener Byways of Nebraska program is expanding. As of today, the program will be known as Greener Nebraska and will be open to all businesses across the state.

 

Developed in 2010 with resources from a National Scenic Byways grant, the Nebraska Department of Economic Development’s Travel and Tourism Division developed the initial program to help tourism-related businesses along Nebraska’s nine Scenic Byways become more environmentally friendly.

 

Going statewide enables the program to reach out to a larger audience. Not only will this open new opportunities for membership, but it will help to spread the word about all the wonderful things businesses are doing to protect the environment. Businesses that go green help keep Nebraska beautiful while attracting tourists who place strong importance on eco-friendly travel.

 

The program’s website—GreenerNebraska.org—includes a variety of information on ways your business can incorporate green practices and offers a free certification program. In addition to the website, media resources have been developed for you to promote your business’s certification and involvement in the program. You can find the materials at GreenerNebraska.org/mediakit.html.

 

Please consider becoming part of Greener Nebraska and begin reaping the rewards of your efforts to protect and preserve the environment.

 

Visit our new website, GreenerNebraska.org, to learn more about the new program, and feel free to share the site with other businesses that may be interested in participating.

American Cowboy Says North Platte, Ne. One of 20 Best Places to Live The West

Thursday, March 24th, 2011

American Cowboy Names North Platte, Neb. One of 20 Best Places to Live The West

 

Boulder, Colo.—The country’s favorite Western lifestyle magazine, American Cowboy, revealed its fourth annual list of “Best Places to Live The West” this week. Editors rounded up a herd of entries from the plains to the Pacific. Only the top 20 won the AC seal of approval as ideal places to hang your ten-gallon hat—for good or just for a good long weekend.

 

“This year’s entries truly live up to the Western ideal of places embodying the rugged, free spirit of the Western version of the American Dream,” said DeAnna Jarnagin, Associate Publisher of American Cowboy. “They’re places where you can experience authentic cowboy culture, spectacular scenery, a true dose of history and, a really, really good steak.”

 

Major criteria for selection include outdoor appeal, historical significance, regional ranching activity and tourism. Editors also considered population, average land price, average household price, median age and the number of Western events held throughout the year. Winners were named for five regions: Texas and The Plains, California and Nevada, The Rockies, The Southwest and The Northwest.

 

The section highlighting North Platte is included below, or you can check out the complete article in the April/May issue of American Cowboy magazine: http://americancowboy.com/travel/trips/texasoklahomagreat-plains.

 

NORTH PLATTE, NEB.

POPULATION: 25,000
LAND STARTS AT: $2,000 per acre
AVG. HOME PRICE: $114,500

 

Deep in the heart of Nebraska, North Platte is steeped in Wild West history and offers a diverse array of activities and a great quality of life. Get up close while touring the Buffalo Bill Ranch State Historical Park, where the legend lived during the heyday of his Wild West Show, or get a bird’s-eye view from the top of the Golden Spike Tower and Visitor Center. With natural beauty, friendly folks, and a rich history, North Platte is a well-rounded Western town.

 

Annual events:
HONKY TONK BBQ FESTIVAL, May (honkytonkbbq.com)
NEBRASKALAND DAYS, June (nebraskalanddays.com)
LINCOLN COUNTY FAIR, July (visitnorthplatte.com)
NEBRASKA STATE RODEO ASSOCIATION STATE FINALS, September (nebraskarodeo.com)

 

Others cities included on the list are:

 

Elko, Nev.

Red Bluff, Calif.

Temecula, Calif.

Bishop, Calif.

Pocatello, Idaho

Baker City, Ore.

Kennewick, Wash.

Lewiston, Idaho

Farmington, N.M.

Tombstone, Ariz.

Logan, Utah

Cedar City, Utah

Sheridan, Wyo.

Cody, Wyo.

Miles City, Mont.

Canon City, Colo.

Amarillo, Texas

Deadwood, S.D.

Guthrie, Okla.

Dr. Peter Tarlow’s Newsletter

Tuesday, January 11th, 2011

TOURISM & MORE’S “TOURISM TIDBITS”
for January 2011
Producing Great Events

Major events are an important part of tourism. Be these events conferences or conventions, sporting events or religious rallies, major events impact almost every area of a tourism industry. Major events mean hotel occupancy, shopping at local retail establishments, food being purchased for and at the event and an increase in restaurant and entertainment revenue. Major events also offer the local community a non-haphazard approach to tourism planning. While the leisure tourism market is open to economic ups and downs due to anything from a change in weather conditions to an act of violence, major events produce a much more stable population. In the world of major events most financial outlays have been made well in advance and as such the event is less subject to market fluctuations. On the other hand, there is stiff competition between locales for the major event business, and in some cases, such as in some forms of sport championship games, it is the winning team that determines who will be the host community.
Events cover a wide range of fields, from fund-raising dinners to political rallies, from sports events to school reunions, from professional and academic conferences to family reunions or religious experiences, all are events and all add to a community’s economic health. To help you get the best meetings and special events for your community consider some of the following:

-If you are attempting to attract a new special event, study every aspect of the event prior to bidding for it. Often communities competing for special events simply do not do their homework. Before speaking with an event specialist, make sure that you know the basics: what are this event’s demographics? What are its special needs? What do they not want? How do their dates match yours? For example, if you are going after a religious convention or special event, you may want to consider what drinks to serve and what you need to avoid.

_To get the best competitive advantage consider your strengths and weaknesses. Doing a good assessment of what your community has to offer an event is essential. Ask questions such as: How do you stack up against others in your price range? Are your employees multilingual? What do potential customers think about what you have to offer and about what others are offering?

-Make sure that you know the answers to what in English are called the basic “w” questions. (Who, Why, When, and What) These are the essential questions that produce not only successful events but create positive word-of-mouth advertising. Make sure that you can answer fully: Who is holding the event and for whom is it targeted? Why are they holding this event? When will the event take place? Where do they want to hold the event and are your facilities adequate? What expectations do the event planners have and can you meet these expectations?

Develop sophisticated checklists. Make sure your checklist goes beyond the basics. Include such items as: what VIP requirements will the special event need? Do the event planners need you to make appointments with the fire marshal or other city officials? What happens if the airport closes down? Do you need to coordinate with an ambulance service? What problems might attendees have when they are outside of the event venue? What special political, medical, religious or social sensitivities might the event goers have?

Know to which threats the event may be subjected. For example, are you in a hurricane zone, is this conference liable to have political infighting that might impact your locale, does this conference act as a terrorism magnet, or will the conference become a disturbance to local businesses and citizens? For example, political events often require streets to be closed off, traffic patterns to be moved and other inconveniences to local residents. While these are not a threat to the convention attendee they may become “threats” to the sanity of the local population and to other businesses.

Decide what is the best use of your time. Events are really controlled moments in time in which memories are made. As such, how you manage your time will impact the success or failure of an event. When working with an event manager spend some time to learn who is in charge of each of the events aspects.

-Learn what the event’s time necessities are and prepare a time line for your role in the event. Often it is the small things that win over a client or make an event special. Having a time line means that there is less chance of a mistake or an oversight. Time lines should indicate not only when something is to be started but also by when it is to be completed.

-Offer the best technological support possible. In today’s world that is both face paced and multi-tasking, technology is king. Hotel’s that charge for internet are doing themselves and their community a disservice. Let your event managers know what technology you have. Do not over-promise, many event managers and business people are unforgiving when it comes to not delivering on a promised piece of technology.

-Nothing wins back people as well as a smile and a willingness to make it right. No matter how well you plan an event, something will go wrong. Most people understand that mishaps will occur, what is not acceptable is refusing to recognize these mistakes and make them right. Saying merely “I’m sorry” is nothing more than a polite way to shun responsibility. Do not make excuses, make it right and make it right with a cheerful smile. The bottom line is that major events are a form of tourism and the essence of tourism is customer service. The community that forgets this basic rule is gambling with its tourism industry and reputation.



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